Places with a Competitive Edge

Here are some of the downtowns, cities, and regions where we have worked to define distinctive place brands through comprehensive research, competitive positioning, graphic design and brand communications to lift them to the next level.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Branding Case Studies

Hudson County, New Jersey

The Tourism Division had been using ‘Gateway to America’ since it was first introduced as a logo and tagline in 1991. There was the need for a more current, inclusive and readily understood brand identity.

Tukwila, Washington

Amid its rapid growth, Tukwila WA needed clear positioning, messaging for target audiences, a visual identity system and plans for developing as a tourism destination. 

Janesville, Wisconsin

Janesville did not have clear positioning for tourism audiences or a unifying message for destination and economic development marketing.

Fairfield, Iowa

The city was not clearly positioned and there was the need for increased focus and consistency in the communications of the CVB and City regarding tourism and economic development.

Tillamook Coast, Oregon

TDM was engaged to develop a place branding strategy to guide the unified marketing of Tillamook County as a unified destination for the first time. Additionally, because of the past marketing focus on individual communities, the Tillamook County name was not widely recognized as a tourism destination.

Sitka, Alaska

Sitka’s identity was dominated by Russian heritage. However the city presented few opportunities to experience the Russian influence. There was low awareness of the city’s outstanding cultural and wilderness attractions among cruise ship passengers. There was the need to reposition the city to present a more contemporary identity. 

Oshkosh, Wisconsin

Oshkosh, while well-known for Oshkosh B’Gosh had an unclear image and no definitive positioning as a destination. The city had been using the tagline “Oshkosh on the Water” for 15 years, however, this no longer reflected what was attracting most visitors. Research also revealed that residents did not have a positive image of their own city.

Gulf Shores, Alabama

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico was devastating to local businesses, particularly those related to tourism. The City required a branded approach to focus messaging and provide an identity system for communications and wayfinding.   

Mankato, Minnesota

Mankato did not have clear positioning or a unifying message and there was a need for better tourism linkages with downtown.

Yakima Valley, Washington

The Yakima Valley was not functioning as a coherent region and inconsistent marketing messages did not contribute to a positive destination image. It had a relatively low self-image, there was no specific competitive positioning and many of the cities and key partners believed that the VCB was too Yakima-centric.

Louisiana's Bayou Country

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico was devastating to local businesses, particularly those related to tourism and sport fishing. The City required a branded approach to focus messaging and provide an identity system for communications and wayfinding.

Eugene, Cascades & Coast (Oregon)

The County had been marketed using the tagline “See all of Oregon in Lane County” which had resulted in weak positioning because it lacked a single unifying and distinctive proposition.

Medford and the Rogue Valley, Oregon

Despite the attractive region surrounding the city, Medford had a negative and bland image and was not considered to be an appealing tourism destination. The tagline used for more than a decade was “The Center of It All” which had not gained traction with target audiences. 

Durham, North Carolina

Durham NC branding lacked clarity. Despite having internationally recognized strengths and achievements, they were not always associated with Durham nor were there common or unified messages being communicated by city partners.

Chicago Northwest IL

The region marketed as Woodfield Chicago Northwest was not well known, individual communities did not identify with the regional name and there was no consistent, unifying message or positioning.

Downtown Oregon City (Oregon)

Downtown Oregon City is undergoing resurgence and is emerging from decades of malaise.  The area is in transition from an old mill town to a new creative center. But the downtown area had no clear identity.

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